Democrats are the New Republicans…



“Democrats are the party of patriotism, because they’re doing something infinitely more urgent and substantive than berating football players who kneel during the national anthem. They’re recognizing that a hostile foreign power tried to change the course of an American presidential election. They’re pressing for a full accounting of that. They’re looking for fixes, so that we can know with confidence that we control our own destiny going forward. The president, meanwhile, plays down the threat, and Republicans prop him up.

Democrats are the party of national security. They don’t taunt and get into Twitter wars with the rulers of countries that just might send nuclear warheads our way. They don’t alienate longtime allies by flashing contradictory signals about their commitment to NATO. The leader of the Republican Party does all of that and more, denying the G.O.P. any pretense to stewardship of a stable world order.

Democrats are the law-and-order party. While many Republicans and their media mouthpiece, Fox News, labor to delegitimize the F.B.I. and thus inoculate Trump, Democrats put faith in prosecutors, agents and the system.

Democrats are the party of decency and modesty. None of their highest leaders uses the public arena to bully private citizens in the way that the Republican president does. None advances his or her financial interests as brazenly or brags as extravagantly.

Democrats are the party of tradition, if it’s interpreted — and it should be — to mean a news media that operates without fear of government interference, an internet to which access isn’t tiered, judicial appointees who have a modicum of fluency in trial law.

Under Trump’s thumb and spell, the Republican Party is watching the pillars of its brand crumble. Democrats should grab hold of and appropriate them. And they’re starting to, fitfully and imperfectly. Jettisoning Al Franken as the Republican National Committee reteamed with Moorewas part of that effort.

Who among us doesn’t care about family values, defined justly and embraced honestly? Who doesn’t see the good in patriotism, tradition and decency? They’re neither hokey words nor musty concepts, and that’s why Republicans have been using (and misusing) them. But in the age of Trump, they constitute a language that Democrats can more credibly speak.”

Frank Bruni  – 

The New York Times


Sweeping Steps

Sweeping steps

Awaiting letters never sent

Sweeping steps

Never sending letters most loved

Sweeping steps

Posting life away

Sweeping steps

Almost swept away in a letter

Sweeping steps

Now posting sweeping steps


Poem & snaps by Mitch Hicks ~ National Poetry Day 2015

Top 50 books by Women Writers


Photo by LadyHawk

1. The Second Sex by Simone de Beauvoir
2. The Women’s Room by Marilyn French
3. The Yellow Wallpaper and Other Stories by Charlotte Perkins Gilman
4. To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
5. The Haunting of Hill House by Shirley Jackson
6. them by Joyce Carol Oates
7. The Heart is a Lonely Hunter by Carson McCullers
8. Beloved by Toni Morrison
9. Oranges are Not the Only Fruit by Jeanette Winterson
10. Forever by Judy Blume
11. The Madcap of the School by Angela Brazil
12. The Well of Loneliness by Radclyffe Hall
13. Delta of Venus by Anais Nin
14. Blood and Guts in High School by Kathy Acker
15. Feminist Theory: From Margin to Center by bell hooks
16. The Clan of the Cave Bear by Jean Auel
17. Push by Sapphire
18. Bring up the Bodies by Hilary Mantel
19. The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas by Gertrude Stein
20. South Riding by Winifred Holtby
21. Circle of Friends by Maeve Binchy
22. The Ballad of the Harp-Weaver by Edna St. Vincent Millay
23. The Other Boleyn Girl by Phillipa Gregory
24. The Feminine Mystique by Betty Friedan
25. Fear of Flying by Erica Jong
26. We Need to Talk about Kevin by Lionel Shriver
27. I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings by Maya Angelou
28. The Dialectic of Sex by Shulamith Firestone
29. White Teeth by Zadie Smith
30. The Secret History by Donna Tartt
31. Gigi by Colette
32. A Good Man is Hard to Find by Flannery O’Connor
33. The Awakening by Kate Chopin
34. Interview with the Vampire by Anne Rice
35. On Lies, Secrets & Silence by Adrienne Rich
36. The Secret Diary of Adrian Mole aged 13 ¾ by Sue Townsend
37. The Story of Tracy Beaker by Jacqueline Wilson
38. The Persistent Desire: A Femme-Butch Reader by Joan Nestle
39. Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston
40. Live or Die by Anne Sexton
41. The Naughtiest Girl in the School by Enid Blyton
42. Suite Francaise by Irène Némirovsky
43. The Age of Innocence by Edith Wharton
44. Enough Rope by Dorothy Parker
45. The Diary of a Young Girl by Anne Frank
46. The Progress of Love by Alice Munro
47. The Disposessed by Ursula K. Le Guin
48. The Story of O by Pauline Réage
49. SCUM Manifesto by Valerie Solanas
50. The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood